Placement

Russian universities will admit Indian students who leave Ukraine: Diplomat

Indian students who had to stop their studies in the middle of their studies to flee the Russia-Ukraine war will be admitted to Russian institutions without having to repeat their prior academic years, according to Roman Babushkin, Deputy Chief of Mission of the Russian Embassy in New Delhi.

According to Babushkin, the students will be accepted to Russian institutions, where they will be able to resume their studies where they left off without having to repeat prior years of study.

The remark was made in response to questions from reporters about what happened to the approximately 20,000 students who left Ukraine when Russia invaded the nation in February.
In circumstances where students have scholarships, said Ratheesh C Nair, Honorary Consul of the Russian Federation and Director of the Russian House in Thiruvananthapuram, the same might be recognized in Russian universities.

However, he suggested that the fees paid in Ukraine may not be sufficient in Russia.

He said that students in Kerala may contact the Russian House here with their marksheets and other academic records, which would be given to Russian universities, who will contact the students and their parents.
Babushkin said that the Ukrainian leadership was sheltering neo-Nazis and that the war was the consequence of Russia’s “Lakshman Rekha” being crossed.

“For Russia, it was a ‘lakshman rekha,’ a red line of red lines crossed by the West,” he remarked. He further said that western countries such as the United States do not want the conflict in Ukraine to stop because the sale of weapons to Ukraine benefits their defense businesses.

He further said that, although the United States has spent billions to establish and sustain the dictatorship in Ukraine, Russia has never believed in such things and has left it up to the people to select who should rule them.

He asserted that neither Russia nor its conflict with Ukraine can be blamed for the global food crisis, claiming that the latter’s contribution of wheat to the global market was less than 1%.

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